Environment

2.3 Water

Wai

Clean, safe water is essential for residents’ quality of life and wellbeing

What we do

Water network

Water collection and treatment

Our water activities contribute to us beingTop

People-centred – A reliable and adequate supply of clean and safe water is critical for the health, wellbeing and prosperity of everyone in Wellington.

Eco-city – An efficient water supply network in which waste is minimised and demand is managed is an important part of being an eco-city.

Connected – A reliable and adequate supply of clean and safe water is a core requirement of a connected city in the 21st Century.

Key projectsTop

During the year:

What it costsTop

Operating Expenditure ($000) Actual
2013
Budget
2013
Variance
2013
Actual
2012
2.3.1 Water Network1        
Expenditure 24,272 23,833 (439) 23,656
Revenue (1,558) (32) 1,526 (1,360)
Net Expenditure 22,714 23,801 1,087 22,296
2.3.2 Water Collection and Treatment        
Expenditure 13,396 13,472 76 13,012
Revenue (4) 4 (3)
Net Expenditure 13,392 13,472 80 13,009
Capital Expenditure ($000) Actual
2013
Budget
2013
Variance
2013
Actual
2012
2.3.1 Water Network2        
Expenditure 12,170 11,990 (180) 12,223
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 397   N/A
  1. Under budget due to the recognition of unbudgeted vested asset income.
  2. Under budget due to delays in the Hospital Prince of Wales reservoir project.

How we performedTop

We aim to supply safe, reliable drinking water. We measure our effectiveness by monitoring water consumption, residents’ satisfaction with water quality and the water network, compliance with New Zealand Drinking Water Standards and response times for service requests.

To measure the quality of water supplied to residents

Compliance with Drinking Water Standards for New Zealand 2005

Compliance was achieved with the New Zealand drinking water standards for all of the city’s water grading zones.

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

Residents’ (%) agreement that water services provide good value for money

Result: 81% (target: 90%; 2011/12: 84%; 2010/11: 85%).

Source: WCC Residents’ Monitoring Survey 2013

Customer complaints regarding water quality (taste and odour)

Result: 165 complaints (target: fewer than 200, 2011/12: 202; 2010/11: 289)

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

Customer satisfaction (%) with water quality and network service

Customer satisfaction (%) with water quality and network service.

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

To measure the performance of services that ensure security of supply

Water pressure

Result: 96% of properties had appropriate water pressure ie minimum 250kPa (target 97%; 2011/12: 96%; 2010/11: 96%).

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

Fire hydrants

Result: 100% of fire hydrants tested met New Zealand Fire Service Code of Practice fire-fighting water supply requirements (target: 95%; 2011/12: 100%).

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

Water distribution network – quality grading

Result: all parts of the network retained the grading of ‘a’ to ‘b’ in the Ministry of Health quality grading (target: ‘a’ to ‘b’ grading).

An ‘a’ grading refers to assets that are completely satisfactory with negligible or very low levels of risk.

A ‘b’ grading refers to assets that are satisfactory with very low levels of risk.

A ‘c’ grading refers to assets that are marginally satisfactory with moderate-low risk.

In 2008, the Ministry of Health graded the entire network. Annually, they ensure this grading has been retained by reviewing the Council’s replacement and/or maintenance of water pipes.

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

Response time to services request (%) within one hour of notification

Response time to services request (%) within one hour of notification.

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

Unaccounted for water (%) from the network

Unaccounted for water (%) from the network.

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

Unaccounted for water (UFW) is mainly water lost through leaks in the public and private network. It also covers water used in fire-fighting, unmetered Council use, and even theft. Over the past 10 years, UFW has fallen sharply, contributing to an overall reduction in the amount of water Wellington uses.

Residential water consumption (per person per day)

Result: 288 litres per person per day (target: 292 litres per person per day; 2011/12: 282; 2010/11: 297).

Source: Capacity Infrastructures Services Ltd

Total city water consumption during the year

Result: 26.6 billion litres (target: less than 30 billion litres; 2010/11: 28.4 billion litres). Water conservation measures, leak detection and remediation have reduced the total water usage.

Source: Capacity Infrastructures Services Ltd