Social and Recreation

5.2 Community participation and support

Tautoko hapori

We recognise the importance of building local community resilience by supporting partnerships and programmes that connect communities and neighbourhoods and enhance community safety

We support a citywide network of community spaces, libraries and support community organisations, and provide homes for people whose needs are not met by state housing or the private housing market

What we do

Libraries

Access support (Leisure Card)

Community advocacy and support

Grants (social and recreation)

Community centres and halls

Housing

Our community and participation support activities contribute towards us being:Top

People-centred – They promote individual wellbeing, safe neighbourhoods and cohesive, engaged and inclusive communities that are better able to cope with change and provide support during times of adversity. They reflect and respond to a diversity of needs and promote accessibility and active and healthy lifestyles. They provide an opportunity for a home and a better quality of life for those less well-off without unreasonable hardship.

Connected – They help people and communities connect and engage with each other and foster the exchange of knowledge and ideas through social, physical and virtual networks.

Dynamic central city – They respond to the diversity of individual and community needs and promote a diverse, safe and vibrant city.

We have worked collaboratively with the homeless community and a range of government agencies/community organisations that work with people experiencing or are vulnerable to homelessness in developing Te Mahana – a draft strategy to end homelessness in Wellington by 2020.

Key projectsTop

During the year:

We are working in partnership with member organisations of the Wellington Council of Social Services to map the city’s social services and build a comprehensive picture of the funding and delivery of social services, to identify current and emergent gaps in social services provision.

We have partnered with Wellington Community Law to develop an online resource to provide guidance and information to assist with all aspects of governance and the operation of running a community centre.

Housing

Housing Upgrade Project

The Housing Upgrade Project is the largest and most intensive social housing redevelopment project ever undertaken in New Zealand. The Council and the Government are sharing the $400 million cost of upgrading 2,300 homes. Treasury took on the oversight of the Project in 2013 and we have been building a positive working relationship with officials.

We have continued to work closely with the Housing New Zealand Corporation (HNZC) at both a national and regional level to make best use of knowledge and resources. This included providing feedback on housing demand forecasting models, sharing information on asset development plans and, with the closure of the Gordon Wilson Apartment building, rehousing a number of HNZC tenants by leasing some of our low-demand units to the Corporation.

A strength based community development programme runs alongside the upgrade to help increase social capital and community spirit and pride within City Housing communities. A partnership with the Ministry of Social Development, Hawkins, and the Building and Construction Industry Training Organisation is proving successful and is placing a number of tenants into employment with Hawkins. We have also worked in partnership with the Wellington Regional Emergency Management Office to increase resilience within the tenant community.

What it costsTop

Operating Expenditure ($000) Actual
2013
Budget
2013
Variance
2013
Actual
2012
5.2.1 Libraries1        
Expenditure 20,104 20,683 579 21,234
Revenue (1,832) (2,284) (452) (2,112)
Net Expenditure 18,272 18,399 127 19,122
5.2.2 Access Support        
Expenditure 125 163 38 120
Revenue
Net Expenditure 125 163 38 120
5.2.3 Community Advocacy        
Expenditure 1,617 1,573 (44) 1,776
Revenue (190) (100) 90 (164)
Net Expenditure 1,427 1,473 46 1,612
5.2.4 Grants (Social and Recreation)        
Expenditure 3,312 3,326 14 6,388
Revenue (17)
Net Expenditure 3,312 3,326 14 6,371
5.2.5 Housing2        
Expenditure 21,115 20,934 (181) 19,051
Revenue (47,010) (52,772) (5,762) (65,754)
Net Expenditure (25,895) (31,838) (5,943) (46,703)
5.2.6 Community Centres and Halls3        
Expenditure 2,853 3,185 332 2,827
Revenue (223) (246) (23) (230)
Net Expenditure 2,630 2,939 309 2,597
Capital Expenditure ($000) Actual
2013
Budget
2013
Variance
2013
Actual
2012
5.2.1 Libraries        
Expenditure 1,995 1,993 (2) 2,066
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A   N/A
5.2.5 Housing4        
Expenditure 31,744 32,876 1,132 49,102
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 6,634   N/A
5.2.6 Community Centres and Halls        
Expenditure 223 269 46 833
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 25   N/A
  1. Under budget due to lower labour and IT costs.
  2. Under budget due to timing of grant income recognition relating to the Housing Upgrade Project.
  3. Under budget due to lower labour, cleaning and depreciation costs.
  4. Under budget due to timing changes on the Housing Upgrade Project and delays in the renewals programme.

How we performedTop

Our aim is for strong, resilient and engaged communities in which everyone feels included.

We aim to provide a high quality library service, and we measure residents’ use of and satisfaction with library services, facilities and range of collection.

We assess success in community support in a variety of ways, including use of community centres and halls and community group satisfaction with Council relationships. We also keep track of the number of groups supported through social and recreation grants.

We aim to provide good quality homes to people whose housing needs are not met by other landlords. We assess our effectiveness by measuring tenant satisfaction, compliance with legal requirements, completion of scheduled upgrades and occupancy rates.

To understand the standard of the services we provide; and the value the public see in them

Libraries – user (%) satisfaction with services and facilities

Result: 87% (target: 90%; 2011/12: 95%; 2010/11: 95%)

Source: WCC Residents’ Monitoring Survey 2013

Libraries – residents’ (%) satisfaction with range and variety of collection

Result: 87% (target: 85%; 2011/12: 92%; 2010/11: 94%)

Source: WCC Residents’ Monitoring Survey 2013

Residents (%) who agree that library services and facilities provide good value for money

Result: 76% (target: 85%; 2011/12: 84%; 2010/11: 86%)

Source: WCC Residents’ Monitoring Survey 2013

To understand the reach and utilisation of recreation services

Users of programmes – recreation centre programmes

Users of programmes – recreation centre programmes.

Source: Recreation Wellington

Number of uses of Leisure Card

Number of uses of Leisure Card.

Source: Recreation Wellington

Residents (%) rating of their ease (easy or very easy) of access to Council recreation facilities and programmes

Result: 55% (target 85%; 2011/12: 79%; 2010/11: 84%)

We are attributing this drop in result to the change in methodology, as the number of people accessing our facilities and programmes has increased dramatically during this last year which would suggest that we are making access easier.

Source: WCC Residents’ Monitoring Survey 2013

To measure the standard of the housing services we provide

Council housing tenants’ satisfaction (%) with services and facilities

Wellington City Council housing tenants’ satisfaction (%) with services and facilities.

Source: WCC Housing Tenants Survey 2013

Council housing tenants’ (%) that rate the overall condition of their house/apartment as good or very good

Wellington City Council housing tenants’ (%) that rate the overall condition of their house/apartment as good or very good.

Source: WCC Housing Tenants Survey 2013

City Housing compliance with legislative requirements

Result: all City Housing services and facilities complied with all legislative requirements (eg Residential Tenancies Act and building warrant of fitness). Target: compliance (2011/12: compliant; 2010/11: compliant).

Source: WCC City Housing

Council housing tenants (%) that feel safe in their complex at night

Wellington City Council housing tenants (%) that feel safe in their complex at night.

Source: WCC Housing Tenants Survey 2013

Council housing tenants (%) who report positive social contact

Result: 87% (target: 65%; 2011/12: 91%; 2010/11: 90%; 2009/10: 90%).

Source: WCC Housing Tenants Survey 2013

To measure the utilisation and demand of the social housing resource

Occupancy rate of available housing facilities

Result: 94% (target: 90%; 2011/12: 83%; 2010/11: 86%).

This is the occupancy for available units – it excludes units we cannot let due to construction and upgrades as part of the Housing Upgrade Project.

Source: WCC City Housing

All tenants (existing and new) housed within policy

Result: 99% (target: 98%).

Source: WCC City Housing

Residents (%) who rate services and facilities as good value for money

Result: 85% (target: 85%; 2011/12: 83%; 2010/11: 83%).

Source: WCC Housing Tenants Survey 2013

To track the progress of the Housing Upgrade Project

Milestones for Housing Upgrade Project

We completed the upgrade of Central Park Apartments in August 2012 and Newtown Park Apartments, ahead of schedule in June 2013, a total of 395 units. The upgrades included seismic strengthening, new kitchens and bathrooms, thermal curtains, improved ventilation and insulation and the reconfiguring of some units.

Construction is currently underway at Berkeley Dallard Apartments and Marshall Court (Miramar) while the revised preliminary design of Kotuku (Kilbirnie) is underway. Engagement with the tenant community included seeking their input to the design phases of all upgrade projects.

We successfully relocated over 140 households either in order to begin construction or get tenants back into upgraded properties. With only small numbers of existing tenants relocating to Central Park and Newtown Park Apartments we have managed to significantly reduce the number of households on the waiting list.

All other projects are on target to meet budgets, and design and tender milestones.

Target: meet all milestones, design standards and budgets (2011/12: achieved).

Source: WCC City Housing

To understand the effectiveness of our community support services

Community groups (%) satisfied with Council relationships

Result: 86% (target: 90%; 2011/12: 79%; 2010/11: 83%)

Source: WCC Community Networks Customer Satisfaction Survey

Residents’ neighbourliness behaviours

Result: 92% of residents have displayed ‘neighbourliness’ behaviour (target: 65%)

Source: WCC Residents’ Monitoring Survey 2013

Accessible Wellington Action Plan initiatives planned for year progressed or completed

Result: 81% (target: 80%)

This is the first year this has been measured, and measurement will be refined and developed in partnership with the Accessibility Advisory Group. An Accessibility Advisor will assist in further developing Council-wide monitoring of accessible projects. To date, projects include developing an open spaces audit checklist with accessibility as key criteria for evaluating effectiveness. Accessibility is also being integrated into project management outcomes and resources, and training has been provided to assist contractors in understanding the need for accessibility in their planning and delivering. Our libraries ensure technologies and services will improve participation and access for all, and are providing accessibility and customer interaction skills training for staff.

Source: WCC Community Networks

To understand the effectiveness of our recreation support distribution

The proportion of grants funds successfully allocated (through milestones being met)

Result: 100% (target: 95%).

Source: WCC Community Networks

Proportion of outcomes delivered (previous projects – weighted by % value)

Result: 96% (target: 90%).

Source: WCC Community Networks

To understand the reach and utilisation of the services we provide

Libraries – Residents (%) who are registered members

Result: 67% (target: 75%; 2011/12: 61%; 2010/11: 78%)

The 75% target was based on the previous library computer system definition of an active library member, and it included customers who remained on the system if they had active debts even if they were not using their library card. We now have the facility to exclude those, which is a more accurate figure of the active memberships.

Source: Wellington City Libraries

Libraries – physical visits and website visits

Libraries – physical visits and website visits.

Targets for 2012/13 onwards were updated and set as part of the 2012-22 Long-term Plan.

Source: Wellington City Libraries

Library programmes – estimated attendees

Result: 81,273 (target: 70,000; 2011/12: 95,544; 2010/11: 89,886).

Source: Wellington City Libraries

Library items issued

Library items issued.

Source: Wellington City Libraries

E-library users’ satisfaction (%) with the online library collection

Result: 70% (target: 67%)

Source: Wellington City Libraries

Occupancy rates (%) of Council community centres and halls

Result: 30% (target: 60%).

There has been a change to the methodology for calculating occupancy rates, which now combines the measure for community centres and community halls. The combined measure calculates occupancy based on the total number of hours the facility can be booked rather than a mix of bookable and staffed hours. We have reset the target from 60% to a new stretch target of 45%. We expect to meet target by the end of 2013.

Source: WCC Community Networks

Homelessness – % of known homeless people supported by agencies

Target: 100%. The result is not available as this will be a component of the Te Mahana (homelessness) project work which is still in development and the tools for this measurement will be a component of the finished strategy in December 2013/January 2014.

Source: WCC Community Networks