Social and Recreation

5.3 Public health and safety

Hauora tūmatanui me te haumanu

We work to protect Wellingtonians from threats to their health and safety

What we do

Burials and cremations

Public toilets

Public health regulations

City safety

Wellington Regional Emergency Management Office (WREMO)

Our public health and safety activities contribute towards us beingTop

People-centred – They make Wellington a safe city that is better able to cope with change.

Dynamic central city – They make the central city a safe place for people to live, work and play.

We have undertaken a joint liquor licensing monitoring programme with Regional Public Health and the New Zealand Police. The programme has included controlled purchase operations (purchase by person under 18 in controlled circumstances), joint inspections and combined enforcement proceedings.

Key projectsTop

During the year:

City safety

We maintained International Safe Community accreditation (WHO safe city status) which emphasises collaboration with partners to deliver safety initiatives in the city. These initiatives include local community and suburban programmes, working in partnership with community police, community patrols and neighbourhood support groups.

Wellington Regional Emergency Management Office (WREMO).

Emergency Management Partnerships

WREMO in association with partner councils gained three awards from the International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM). Two were for the Blue Line project and one for the CDEM Volunteer Programme which won the 2013 Partnership in Preparedness Oceania award. This recognised WREMO for its development of a new volunteer programme that leverages its efforts to build a connected and prepared community through its new philosophy, Community-Driven Emergency Management (CDEM). The four-module course, including a new volunteer handbook, was created to reflect the change of philosophy toward social capacity-building and community focus. The new programme stands apart from others, with its strong emphasis on connectedness and preparedness while continuing to build solid community response capacity.

What it costsTop

Operating Expenditure ($000) Actual
2013
Budget
2013
Variance
2013
Actual
2012
5.3.1 Burials and Cremations        
Expenditure 1,760 1,680 (80) 1,646
Revenue (865) (824) 41 (802)
Net Expenditure 895 856 (39) 844
5.3.2 Public Toilets        
Expenditure 2,164 2,168 4 2,311
Revenue (2)
Net Expenditure 2,164 2,168 4 2,309
5.3.3 Public Health Regulations        
Expenditure 3,878 3,861 (17) 4,775
Revenue (2,533) (2,483) 50 (2,430)
Net Expenditure 1,345 1,378 33 2,345
5.3.4 City Safety        
Expenditure 2,105 2,127 22 1,781
Revenue (59) (10) 49 (3)
Net Expenditure 2,046 2,117 71 1,778
5.3.5 WREMO        
Expenditure 2,010 1,934 (76) 2,202
Revenue (148) (38) 110 (84)
Net Expenditure 1,862 1,896 34 2,118
Capital Expenditure ($000) Actual
2013
Budget
2013
Variance
2013
Actual
2012
5.3.1 Burials and Cremations        
Expenditure 110 109 (1) 215
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A   N/A
5.3.2 Public Toilets1        
Expenditure 734 735 1 418
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 150   N/A
5.3.4 City Safety        
Expenditure 173
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A   N/A
5.3.5 WREMO        
Expenditure 85
  1. Under budget due to delays in the renewal of the Martin Luckie Park Pavilion. The planning process has taken longer than expected.

How we performedTop

We aim to protect and enhance public health and safety. We measure our effectiveness through residents’ satisfaction with, and complaints about, facilities and services and by monitoring food premises’ compliance with health and safety standards.

To measure the progress towards minimising threats to public safety

Emergency management

As of July 2012 a new regionally shared emergency management organisation (Wellington Regional Emergency Management Office – WREMO) has been operating. The new organisation is hosted by the Greater Wellington Regional Council but it is accountable to the region’s Mayors and the Chief Executives’ Group of all the regional local authorities.

WREMO has updated a number of regional emergency management plans and is delivering training programmes for Civil Defence volunteers. In addition it has been reorganising the main Emergency Operations Centres for the region and ensuring these will be ready to be activated in an emergency. The agreed plans contain a number of key performance indicators which will be monitored.

A total of 144 people (equivalents) were trained throughout the region in EOC/emergency related skills. Further courses will be programmed.

Number of trained Civil Defence volunteers

Result: 382 (target: 400)

Source: WCC City Networks

To understand the effectiveness of our public health and safety services and programmes

Dog control – complaints received (% of registered dogs)

Result: 26% (target: maintain or improve – there is no historical data for this measure. Next year the target will be for complaints received to be 26% or less of registered dogs.)

Source: WCC Public Health

Response to service requests – dog control

Result: We responded to 98% of urgent requests within one hour (target: 100%; 2011/12: 97%; 2010/11: 100%), and 99% of non-urgent requests within 24 hours (target: 99%; 2011/12 99%; 2010/11: 99%).

Urgent dog attacks are defined as attacks on people or other animals.

Source: WCC Public Health

Food premises – number of cleaning notices and closures per year

Result: There were 38 cleaning notices and closures during the year. There is no target for this measure.

Source: WCC Public Health

Food premises (%) with excellent or very good hygiene ratings that maintain or improve their rating

Food premises (%) with excellent or very good hygiene ratings that maintain or improve their rating.

The target was increased to 98% from 95% last year. This measures performance of premises during the year to ensure they maintain required health standards. Downgrading can be due to numerous factors, most commonly loss of trained staff, deferred maintenance, and reduced cleaning standards.

Source: WCC Public Health

Residents’ (%) satisfaction with the cleanliness of Council public toilets (satisfied or neutral responses)

Residents’ (%) satisfaction with the cleanliness of Wellington City Council public toilets (satisfied or neutral responses).

Source: WCC Residents’ Monitoring Survey 2013

Response to service requests – public toilets

Result: We responded to 100% of urgent requests within one hour (target: 100%; 2011/12: 98%), and 95% of non-urgent requests within three days (target: 95%; 2011/12 98%).

Source: WCC Parks and Gardens

Council public toilets that meet required cleanliness and maintenance performance standards

Wellington City Council public toilets that meet required cleanliness and maintenance performance standards.

Source: WCC Parks and Gardens

Percentage of planned inspections carried out for high risk (category 3) premises

Result: We achieved 100% of after-hours inspections for high risk liquor premises. This is a new Annual Plan measure.

Source: WCC Public Health

Percentage of inspections of high risk premises (category 3) carried out during high trading hours

Result: 26% (target: 25%) This is a new Annual Plan measure.

Source: WCC Public Health